"A lot of people in Olympia are skeptical of people peddling bullshit. That’s sort of the trend, and it’s a really cool aspect of Olympia; that some band like Surfer Blood can’t just walk in and charm a bunch of high school students. It’s like, ‘No, no one goes to that show. Sorry.’ There’s definitely a skepticism. I think there’s more identity politics involved with that.”

“We play “TV” and “Trash World” back-to-back at a lot of shows. When I’m playing them I don’t think of them being the same song at all, they’re kind of like exploring different subject matter for me… I feel like were exploring a slightly different space than we were on the last record. Like, we’re using the same methodology to explore; trying to find pop music, but from a different prospective.”

"…I like really minimal music and then trying to find interesting things out of it rather then trying to make something really elaborate and orchestral. I like the idea of working with really restrictive concepts and trying to find something interesting within them."

PUNK IS DEAD

is a mantra I’ve been hearing my entire life. Chastised for taking punk to pop, the faster anarchistic music had fallen out of favor and replaced with the grunge-loving, slacker vibe of the ’90s. We still cared, but we cared in a slightly less aggressive manner. Then Bush happened. Then Katrina happened. Then two wars happened. Then Sandy Hook happened. Citizens United, Ferguson, GMOs, tax breaks for tax-dodging corporations… point is there’s enough source material for Billy Joel to sing five or six more “We Didn’t Start The Fire”s. So where is punk?

“Maybe if you did something the opposite of why you are currently trying to make music then maybe you could find some freedom and truth in that and it can be beautiful for you, and then it won’t matter if it isn’t in record stores or on a label, and you’ll realize it’s beautiful that way. And then maybe if you do that, you’ll get some other people that will honor your effort in making art your own way.”

“That is another chapter in finding transcendence through art—finding an audience in a more authentic way.”

markbaumer:

text: “develop/a/career/and/marry/the/nicest/house”
On page 119 of “Freedom,”Jonathan Franzen looks at his bank account and realizes he only has a couple hundred thousand dollars which scares him because he had been telling his friends he was a millionaire. 
background info about the project

MINE

markbaumer:

text: “develop/a/career/and/marry/the/nicest/house”

On page 119 of “Freedom,”Jonathan Franzen looks at his bank account and realizes he only has a couple hundred thousand dollars which scares him because he had been telling his friends he was a millionaire. 

background info about the project

MINE

Starred review in Kirkus for INFORMATION DOESN’T WANT TO BE FREE, my next book

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

My next book, Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free, comes out in November, but the reviews have just started to come in. Kirkus gave it a stellar review. Many thanks to neil-gaiman and amandafuckingpalmer for their wonderful introductions!

In his best-selling novel Ready Player One, Ernest Cline predicted that decades from now, Doctorow (Homeland, 2013, etc.) should share the presidency of the Internet with actor Wil Wheaton. Consider this manifesto to be Doctorow’s qualifications for the job.

The author provides a guide to the operation of the Internet that not only makes sense, but is also written for general readers. Using straightforward language and clear analogies, Doctorow breaks down the complex issues and tangled arguments surrounding technology, commerce, copyright, intellectual property, crowd funding, privacy and value—not to mention the tricky situation of becoming “Internet Famous.” Following a characteristically thoughtful introduction by novelist Neil Gaiman, rock star Amanda Palmer offers a blunt summary of today’s world: “We are a new generation of artists, makers, supporters, and consumers who believe that the old system through which we exchanged content and money is dead. Not dying: dead.” So the primary thesis of the book becomes a question of, where do we go from here? Identifying the Web’s constituents as creators, investors, intermediaries and audiences is just the first smart move. Doctorow also files his forthright, tactically savvy arguments under three “laws,” the most important of which has been well-broadcast: “Any time someone puts a lock on something that belongs to you and won’t give you the key, that lock isn’t there for your benefit.”

Read the whole review

People call out to you and you call back to them–if you’re worth a damn. Lately I’ve not been worth much, but I’m trying.

Does it matter? Does anything matter? Sometimes life feels like endless buckets of shit dumped off a cliff onto your head in slow motion while cheesy, porny saxophone music plays. Futile. Empty. Silly. Action without payoff. Ambition without the promise of acknowledgement.

I know what the inverse of action is and I don’t want anything to do with that. And I know this: Once you stop you start to rot. And by “stop” I don’t mean “relax.” By all means relax every single chance you get. The ability to relax and look inward in the midst of struggle is part of what makes us who we are.

bikinganddancingandsinging:

But you have to keep believing in your path and in a future where your life will be better than it is now. Belief counts for a lot. So does planning big and shoving yourself into the nasty thick of life. That’s what you need to do: believe, push, pay attention, know when to step back and heal, and don’t mess around with dreamlessness. Go, fight, win.

The final paragraph of this, and really most of this, was exactly what I’ve been searching for all night.

(via wearepioneerspress)


.@scottmccloud's THE SCULPTOR is the best GN I’ve read in years. It’s about art & love & why we keep on trying. It will break your heart.

Is It Dirty: A Love Letter to New York’s Grit from Frank O’Hara, 1964

Enjoy a reading of “Song (Is it dirty)” by O’Hara himself, an audio excerpt from the TV programUSA: Poetry: Frank O’Hara, a 12-part documentary series produced and directed by Richard Moore for National Education Television. This episode was filmed on March 5, 1966, at O’Hara’s New York City home and originally aired on September 1, 1966.

Is it dirty
does it look dirty
that’s what you think of in the city

does it just seem dirty
that’s what you think of in the city
you don’t refuse to breathe do you

someone comes along with a very bad character
he seems attractive. is he really. yes very
he’s attractive as his character is bad. is it. yes

that’s what you think of in the city
run your finger along your no-moss mind
that’s not a thought that’s soot

and you take a lot of dirt off someone
is the character less bad. no. it improves constantly
you don’t refuse to breathe do you

 99% Invisible

An elixir crafted to combat insomnia, promote deep sleep, and encourage lucid dreaming . The synergistic blend is composed of botanicals across time as the medicines that record history. Traditionally, these herbs have been used by monks, shamans, and scientists for their deeply restorative properties on the hypothalamus - a pearl sized control center in the brain that directs the body’s most important functions. These herbs regulate the stress impacted onto neurological networks; creating a more relaxed and peaceful body and mind.

Contains: Kalia, Ashwagandha, Passionflower, Kava Kava, Guayusa, Blue Lotus, Ginger, and Cinnamon Bark

dimlylitmealsforone:

Thankfully, this determined food photographer was able to document the moment their iPad fell into a pile of diseased bronchial tissue and toasted almonds.
I’m not sure, but I suspect that their priceless reaction to the near miss their apple products suffered was captured for posterity by their dining partner, which in turn lead to them recording the hilarious reaction to the reaction and so on and so forth, until the couple were just holding phones up to one another’s braying faces while their meals congealed on their plates.
Trapped in an endless feedback loop of mealtime surveillance.

dimlylitmealsforone:

Thankfully, this determined food photographer was able to document the moment their iPad fell into a pile of diseased bronchial tissue and toasted almonds.

I’m not sure, but I suspect that their priceless reaction to the near miss their apple products suffered was captured for posterity by their dining partner, which in turn lead to them recording the hilarious reaction to the reaction and so on and so forth, until the couple were just holding phones up to one another’s braying faces while their meals congealed on their plates.

Trapped in an endless feedback loop of mealtime surveillance.

(Source: facebook.com)


The historic Flat Iron Building in Trenton, NJ stands as a symbol of Griffith Electric Supply and William & Meta Griffith’s shared dream. In 1938 Bill & Meta opened the doors to a business that has endured the test of time, through the Great Depression, a World War and the Vietnam Conflict, the riots of the 60’s, and slumping economy’s they held fast to their belief in Trenton and this State. Growing and even flourishing in the good years, first as the team of Bill and Meta, and then on her own, as Mrs. Meta A. Griffith, they devoted more than 70 years to Griffith Electric Supply and Trenton, building a family of dedicated employees, who today strive to carry on their dream and honor their memory.