A prolific and accomplished colleague recently told me about a sudden, unexpected bout of despair. After a day of unproductive writing, he decided his book project was both wrongheaded and impossible to complete. He even contemplated returning the advance his publisher had given him.

But after waiting just a day, he realized he had lost track of the true focus of his book. He recommitted to the actual focus (and wrote it down!) and immediately felt back on track, and ready to continue. A less experienced writer might have stayed stuck, despairing for weeks—or longer.

So getting tenure doesn’t mean we’ve fully mastered our writing issues; it only means those issues haven’t yet overwhelmed us (or that we’ve become good at hiding them). In fact, because being “unproductive” is such an academic sin, most faculty members would rather die than admit to experiencing writing problems of any kind. So we suffer silently through cycles of fear and frustration, writing and revision, rejection and resubmission, and we keep our doubt to ourselves.

taste the shamebow

taste the shamebow

just-another-blogging-recoverer:

Daily planning can:

  • Help you regain a sense of control over your life.
  • Counteract the feelings of helplessness that go with depression.
  • Help you practice following a plan rather than your feelings and mood.
  • Expose you to “reinforcement” in the form of positive feelings of accomplishment.

(Source: imdb.com)

meathead martian

meathead martian